people and work

 

population

 

families

 

occupations

 

schools

 

leisure

 

war time

 

the militia

 

customs & legends

 

charity

 

occupations

See the Directories page for lists of village tradespeople from 1854 to 1914.

handloomweavers - AW Bayes.jpg (24499 bytes)

Handloom weaving

AW Bayes

 

1650

Between c1650 and the early 1800s, hand loom weaving was the most common occupation in the western area of Rockingham Forest. In 1777, there were 23 weavers living in Cottingham (some are listed on the 1777 militia list), but competition from large industrial mills led to the collapse of the hand loom weaving industry in the early years of the 19th century.

This caused a great deal of poverty and hardship for local people, especially in Corby where, at one time, around 89% of the working population was engaged in weaving and related activities. In Kettering, with over a third of the population on poor relief, the situation became so desperate that the town declared itself bankrupt!

By 1841, the industry had all but disappeared in the area.

 

1800

 

In 1800, the lowest weekly wage for regular employment in the area was two shillings a week (around 4.90 in today's money) and the highest nine shillings and sixpence (around 22).

1841

In 1841, the main occupation was farming and agriculture, with the second most common occupation being domestic service. 

There were ten 15 year olds working - six as servants, one apprentice and two agricultural labourers. There was also one 12 year old working as a servant: Comfort Tansley worked as a live-in servant for John Claypole, a publican on High Street (possibly the Three Horseshoes).

1841 Occupations

Male

Female

Total

Farming/agriculture

85 0 85

Domestic/in service

11 18 29

Local services

12 1 13

Building/construction 

12 0 12

Textiles

7 0 7

Apprentices/miscellaneous/unclear

7 3 10
Adults not working 10 140 150

Adults working (% of total adult population)

126 (93%) 18 (11%) 188 (62%)
Click on the hyperlinks above for breakdowns of the Occupation categories

1901

1901 Occupations

Male

Female

Total

Farming/agriculture

83

0

83

Building/construction

37

0

37

Industrial general

3

0

3

Textiles - industrial

6

25

31

Textiles - domestic

5

4

9

Local services

12

2

14

Domestic/in service

17

12

29

Miscellaneous

2

3

5

Retired/army pensioner

3

3

6

Adults not working 3 125 128

Adults working (% of total adult population)

165  (96%)

42 (23%)

211 (41%)

 

Click on the hyperlinks above for breakdowns of the Occupation categories

In 1901, the main source of income for local villagers was still farming and agriculture, with more than half of the men in the village working on the land. 

By this time, other common occupations for village men were the local ironstone pits, brick making and gardening. The single women who went out to work were employed mainly as tailoresses and machinists at the local clothing factory, or as domestic servants. Interestingly though, not one of the married women in Cottingham went out to work. How times change!

The census also reveals 14 children aged between 13 and 15 going out to work. All aged 13, John Cook was employed as a page boy at The Rectory, Annie Jarvis as a tailoress at the clothing factory and William Claypole worked on his dad's farm. 14 year old Fred Pauler worked as a clerk at the clothing factory.  

There were 12 employers living in the village - eight farmers, a builder, a stone mason, a baker and a publican34 people were self employed, of which 17 worked from home. Occupations included tailor/dressmaker, laundress, shoe and boot maker, baker and carpenter/wheelwright

Click on the hyperlinks above for breakdowns of the Occupation categories

2001

The estimates given for Cottingham are based on information from the 2001 Census (for Corby's rural west ward covering Cottingham, Middleton and East Carlton) and the 2001 Electoral Roll for Cottingham village.

2001 Occupations

Rural West ward

% of adult population (16+)

Estimate for Cottingham

Employed 814 65.8% 491
Unemployed 24 1.9% 14
Economically active full-time students 28 2.3% 17
Economically inactive students 38 3.1% 23
Other economically inactive 18 1.2% 9
Looking after home/family 58 4.7% 35
Permanently sick or disabled 40 3.2% 24
Retired 220 17.8% 133

 

To compare these statistics with national averages, visit the national statistics 2001 Census website

 

 

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